BLOG

Welcoming the New Year with a healthy perspective

weight loss - healthy perspective

Every January, it’s unavoidable that the new year brings with it New Year’s resolutions. Often, such include items and actions that have something to do with weight loss, training more or getting fit. 

Research suggests there is a relationship between gaining and losing weight frequently and unfavourable health consequences. They include having numerous effects on a person’s cardiovascular and mental health. This is according to a study that looked at the mortality risk reduction associated with weight loss versus physical exercise.

Yo-yoing has been linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease due to its effects on hypertension, visceral fat storage, changes in adipose tissue fatty acid content, and insulin resistance. 

This is why a better New Year’s resolution is to boost overall wellness and health rather than lose weight. But this attitude makes perfect sense as most of us are impatient. Unfortunately, the reality is that healthily losing weight takes time. 

So when we do not see the results we want in a short time frame, we are discouraged. As a result, we get discouraged, go back to our old ways, and binge eat. When we realize what we are doing, we once again go on a strict diet. Typically, these strict diets demonize certain enjoyment foods and puts us in a sense of shame if we eat them. This is not healthy.

This can harm our mental health. Emotionally, it’s a cycle of highs and lows. We are on a high when we are rewarded with weight loss. Our self-esteem increases, and we become more confident. Our other physiological responses increase as well. 

Weight gain, on the other hand, can lead to a drop in mood, a loss of confidence, negative body image and comments, and an increase in symptoms of depression.

Furthermore, when people say they want to reduce their weight, what they truly mean is “I want to feel fit and healthy.” When they are in the shower, they want to feel some muscle tone. People also want to be stable, robust, and balanced. They want to look forward to getting out of bed in the morning.

This idea of focusing on fitness will lead to a longer and better quality of life. 

Here are some movement- and health-based ideas that can help you in your fitness journey:

Find out why you are doing what you are doing.

Setting a fitness goal isn’t the only thing to consider. To be effective, you must first determine why this objective is so important to you. You need to fully understand and embrace your WHY! You may tap into your drive to sustain progress toward the goal by focusing on the why. After this, you can break down objectives into more process-oriented goals, which will set you up for success.

Use the SMART method.

Once you’ve determined your why or mission, you can focus on the specifics of how to achieve it. S.M.A.R.T. goals—Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-based—come into play here. 

If you want to take it to the next level, you can work SMARTER. The two extra letters are Evaluate and Reset.

Setting a goal, understanding why you want to achieve it, and figuring out how to get there can help you be more productive. You must also be kind to yourself, which is why being contemplative and purposeful is essential. It would be fantastic if you were also open to changing and adapting your objectives. Now set goals within your end game goal. We know that by setting smaller goals along your journey, these small wins help build your confidence and feed your motivation.

If you aim to improve your fitness and move your body more, for example, you’ll need to create a plan to get there. Is it a case of being more deliberate about exercising your body for 30 minutes every day? And, if that’s the case, what actions may you engage in to make this a reality? Is it 30 minutes of daily walking with your dog or 30 minutes of daily running?

Bloom where you are planted.

There are several movement and fitness-related objectives. Running your first 5K, hiking a path in a new personal best time, mastering crow position, or increasing your push-ups are all good activities. While they are not necessarily related to weight reduction, they can help you get there if you are consistent.

The hitch is that you must coach yourself while being aware of your current level, not where you want to be. To run your first marathon, you shouldn’t have to train like the world’s fastest guy. Simply push yourself at your speed and distance, and concentrate on what you can do and how you can develop. Again, setting small achievable goals along the way is the key to success.

Change the narrative in your mind.

Allowing your “but”, or “I’ll start next week” to get in the way is not a good idea. If you establish a goal to run after work, you’ll never achieve it if you continually say, “I want to lift weights, but I’m too tired.” However, breaking through and succeeding will require you to reframe your ‘but’ story to one that supports your goal.

The key is to talk to yourself this way: “The truth is, my body has been sitting all day and is well-rested. I can do this.” 

Saying this also helps: “My thoughts and emotions are exhausted, and lifting weights will aid in the recovery of my mind and emotions.” Creating a supportive story for your objectives can make them simpler to attain.

Have fun.

Remember that fitness should be enjoyable rather than a chore. The cool stuff includes activities such as basketball, tennis, bike riding, Like the author who has got back on his BMX after 35 years, hiking clubs, ski groups etc, the list is endless. Getting in shape should be the most enjoyable aspect of your day. You should perform some enjoyable, healthful exercise every day since it helps you feel fabulous.

We must reel it in slowly and deliberately, patting ourselves on the back for minor victories along the way.

So, each day, set a goal to be conscious of one area in which you may focus that will help you feel better in the following 24 hours. Then start over the next day.

If you are looking at getting personal training in Carnegie, get in touch with the MoveWell Health and Fitness team.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn